Crunch the Radish

Come and see what’s inspiring the latest Kräuterkollektiv creations

Come and see what’s inspiring the latest Kräuterkollektiv creations

Aspargus!

Spargel Spargel Spargel!

One thing no one can miss when moving in Germany is the absolute passion of the Germans for aspargus, the first sign of the spring! I guess it would be hard to find one restaurant in Berlin who doesnt´t propose aspargus on the menu when it´s on season… And as it season is so short, it´s hard to be tired of it!

This delicate vegetable grows a lot in Germany, and in Europ. It was cultivated since the Antiquity, and we can even see it on some egyptian drawings!

Aspargus is also super healthy so no reason not to enjoy it! Very rich in fibers, its the best you can offer to your digestive system… It´s also very low in calorie, and rich in potassium, calcium and vitamins.

So quick, try this very easy and delicious recipe!

 

ASPARGUS FLAN:

 

500g asparagus – about 410 g after peeling etc

½ lemon juice

2 generous pinch salt

1 generous pinch cracked black pepper

90 mL soy cream

½ tsp agar agar

 

  1. Simmer the asparagus in salty water until tender
  2. Drain them and pat dry them
  3. Put in the mixer bowl with the lemon juice, salt, pepper, cream and blitz till smooth
  4. Dissolve the agar in 2 spoons of water, then boil it
  5. Add to the mix and blitz again
  6. Put in a long cake mould with plastic underneath
  7. Let cool down in the fridge for 3-4 hours before to take out of the mould and cut
  8. This recipe can be done the day before and stored in the fridge overnight

 

 

When it´s set, take the flan out of the mould and slice it (you can also use individual moulds)

We like to serve it with a little salad topped with raw aspargus shavings.

Enjoy!

One thing no one can miss when moving in Germany is the absolute passion of the Germans for aspargus, the first sign of the spring! I guess it would be hard to find one restaurant in Berlin who doesnt´t propose aspargus on the menu when it´s on season… And as it season is so short, it´s hard to be tired of it!

This delicate vegetable grows a lot in Germany, and in Europ. It was cultivated since the Antiquity, and we can even see it on some egyptian drawings!

Aspargus is also super healthy so no reason not to enjoy it! Very rich in fibers, its the best you can offer to your digestive system… It´s also very low in calorie, and rich in potassium, calcium and vitamins.

So quick, try this recipe!

 

ASPARGUS FLAN:

 

500g asparagus – about 410 g after peeling etc

½ lemon juice

2 generous pinch salt

1 generous pinch cracked black pepper

90 mL soy cream

½ tsp agar agar

 

  1. Simmer the asparagus in salty water until tender
  2. Drain them and pat dry them
  3. Put in the mixer bowl with the lemon juice, salt, pepper, cream and blitz till smooth
  4. Dissolve the agar in 2 spoons of water, then boil it
  5. Add to the mix and blitz again
  6. Put in a long cake mould with plastic underneath
  7. Let cool down in the fridge for 3-4 hours before to take out of the mould and cut
  8. This recipe can be done the day before and stored in the fridge overnight

 

 

IMG_20150416_160231

 

When it´s set, take the flan out of the mould and slice it (you can also use individual moulds)

We like to serve it with a little salad topped with raw aspargus shavings.

Enjoy!

Happy Birthday Liz!

Happy Birthday Liz!

Yep, it that time of the year again – the Queen’s birthday.

 

IMG_5024I decided to pay homage with the Great British classic, scones! Only this time a vegan – gluten free recipe….

 

  • 225g four
  • 15g baking powder (one pack)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 50g organic vegan butter
  • 25g cane sugar
  • 150ml rice milk

 

IMG_5025

I followed the same basic method,

Preheat the oven to 220°c.

Crumble the butter into the dry ingredients with ones finger tips and then add the milk and gently forming into a ball.

Pat down until about 1.5cm thick and cut into rounds, reform the dough and cut again.

Bake for 6-10 minutes (depending on your sizes) they are ready when well risen and pale golden.

IMG_5028

I wanted to see just how much of a difference a egg glaze makes so I beat one egg and brushed the tops, allowed it to dry slightly then brushed again before baking.

My conclusion; its not worth the extra mess or egg. An extra sprinkle of sugar or dusting of flour is attractive enough.

 

IMG_5038

 

Overall they tasted OK, they didn’t rise as much as I hoped but smaller scones would help this as well as a self-raising flour mix and they were just a little dry so next time I use gluten free flour I would add 1 tbsp of sour cream or yogurt to hold the moisture.

Still, thumbs up from Queenie!

Yep, it that time of the year again – the Queen’s birthday.

 

IMG_5024I decided to pay homage with the Great British classic, scones! Only this time a vegan – gluten free recipe….

 

  • 225g four
  • 15g baking powder (one pack)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 50g organic vegan butter
  • 25g cane sugar
  • 150ml rice milk

 

IMG_5025

I followed the same basic method,

Preheat the oven to 220°c.

Crumble the butter into the dry ingredients with ones finger tips and then add the milk and gently forming into a ball.

Pat down until about 1.5cm thick and cut into rounds, reform the dough and cut again.

Bake for 6-10 minutes (depending on your sizes) they are ready when well risen and pale golden.

IMG_5028

I wanted to see just how much of a difference a egg glaze makes so I beat one egg and brushed the tops, allowed it to dry slightly then brushed again before baking.

My conclusion; its not worth the extra mess or egg. An extra sprinkle of sugar or dusting of flour is attractive enough.

 

IMG_5038

 

Overall they tasted OK, they didn’t rise as much as I hoped but smaller scones would help this as well as a self-raising flour mix and they were just a little dry so next time I use gluten free flour I would add 1 tbsp of sour cream or yogurt to hold the moisture.

Still, thumbs up from Queenie!

Spice things up

Spice things up

Used across Lebanon, Syria, and all the west coast of Mediterranean, Za’atar in its various form and guises is a aromatic condiment made from dried herbs and seeds.

Originally, the term “za´atar” name the family of the plants that includes origan, thym, marjoram, savory etc. Its traditionnal use is with olive oil and flat bread, a delight!

I think there is an infinite number of recipes but a nice basic one which tastes good to us is equal quantities of thyme, marjoram, sumac and toasted sesame seeds mixed together with a touch of salt. We like to make a big box of it and use it for many different things in the kitchen: on roasted potatoes, with eggplants, in white bean cream… It´s always better to use it after cooking cause the heat deteriorate its taste.

The sumac gives to Zaátar its special twist: its fruty and slightly sour taste is very remarkable,as well as its beautiful purple colour. In Iran, it´s a tradition to put it on the table on New Years Day to make the new year a good one!

02

Sprinkle it on your everyday basics to jazz it up, here I’ve roasted it with chickpeas, courgettes and carrots and used it to season some strained yogurt.

03

The garlic of the bears

Bärlauch

What a curious name for this wild herbs that grows everywhere in Germany when spring is coming. Like aspargus and rhubarb,it´s a sign that winter is finally over.

This plant, “Allium ursinium”, also called ‘ramsons’, ‘wild leek’, ‘buckrams’, ‘wild garlic’, ‘broad-leaved garlic’, ‘wood garlic’, ‘bear leek’,  ‘bear’s garlic´, and in german “bärlauch” takes its name from a legend… After hibernating for a long winter, the bears finally go out in the forest and they love the wild garlic and eat a lot of it. It tastes remind to garlic but lighter and fresher.

 IMG-20150406-WA0001

Hannah went to pick up some wild garlic in the Leipzig forest…

His benefits are quite similar to garlic – but it´s easier to digest: rich in vitamin C, it´s a bootser for the cardiovascular system, and it´s also known as antiseptic. It used to be considered as a magic plant, and pregnant women were carrying some in their posckets to protect their future child.

It season is very short, that´s why we want to cook it with everything! It´s also quite easy to freeze, just wash it and hack it and freeze it in bags. Or you can also freeze the pesto, and you´ll enjoy this delicious herbs all year long!

It´s better to blanch it first, cause its flavour is quite strong raw.

Blitzed with almonds, oilve oil and black pepper, it makes a delicious pesto to serve on crispy slice of breads for the first “apéros” outside. Top it with slices of pickled raddishes for the freshness, and you will feel the spring exploding in your mouth!

For the pesto:  1 bunch of wild garlic

1 lemon juice

60 g of almonds

70 mL of virgin olive oil

Blanch the wild garlic and blitz all the ingredient together. Taste and season. If you find it too strong, you can always mix it with creme fraiche or cream cheese, it´s also delicious!

For the raddishes: 1 bunch of pink raddishes

50 mL of white vinaiger

30 g of white sugar

1 tsp of peppercorns

1 tsp of coriander seeds

1 anis star

IMG_20150330_183415

In a small pan, heat the sugar, vinaiger and water with the spices. Slice the raddishes, and cover them with the pickling liquid Let cool down.

Spread some pesto on your slices of baguette. Top with the raddishes.

It´s a delight with a fresh white beer! Happy spring!

What a curious name for this wild herbs that grows everywhere in Germany when spring is coming. Like aspargus and rhubarb,it´s a sign that winter is finally over.

This plant, “Allium ursinium”, also called ‘ramsons’, ‘wild leek’, ‘buckrams’, ‘wild garlic’, ‘broad-leaved garlic’, ‘wood garlic’, ‘bear leek’,  ‘bear’s garlic´, and in german “bärlauch” takes its name from a legend… After hibernating for a long winter, the bears finally go out in the forest and they love the wild garlic and eat a lot of it. It tastes remind to garlic but lighter and fresher.

 IMG-20150406-WA0001

Hannah went to pick up some wild garlic in the Leipzig forest…

His benefits are quite similar to garlic – but it´s easier to digest: rich in vitamin C, it´s a bootser for the cardiovascular system, and it´s also known as antiseptic. It used to be considered as a magic plant, and pregnant women were carrying some in their posckets to protect their future child.

It season is very short, that´s why we want to cook it with everything! It´s also quite easy to freeze, just wash it and hack it and freeze it in bags. Or you can also freeze the pesto, and you´ll enjoy this delicious herbs all year long!

It´s better to blanch it first, cause its flavour is quite strong raw.

Blitzed with almonds, oilve oil and black pepper, it makes a delicious pesto to serve on crispy slice of breads for the first “apéros” outside. Top it with slices of pickled raddishes for the freshness, and you will feel the spring exploding in your mouth!

For the pesto:  1 bunch of wild garlic

1 lemon juice

60 g of almonds

70 mL of virgin olive oil

Blanch the wild garlic and blitz all the ingredient together. Taste and season. If you find it too strong, you can always mix it with creme fraiche or cream cheese, it´s also delicious!

For the raddishes: 1 bunch of pink raddishes

50 mL of white vinaiger

30 g of white sugar

1 tsp of peppercorns

1 tsp of coriander seeds

1 anis star

IMG_20150330_183415

In a small pan, heat the sugar, vinaiger and water with the spices. Slice the raddishes, and cover them with the pickling liquid Let cool down.

Spread some pesto on your slices of baguette. Top with the raddishes.

It´s a delight with a fresh white beer! Happy spring!

Happy Easter!

Fröhliche Ostern!

Garibaldi is the name, biscuit’s the game

Bring some English tradition to your Easter celebrations by whipping up a batch of garibaldi biscuits with our simplified but just as tasty recipe.

What you need:

120g sugar

110g butter

1 egg

225g flour (in this batch I used gluten free)

1/2 tsp mixed spice (this is tricky to find in Germany so I used lebkuchengewürz which is almost the same)

80g currents

1/2 orange zest

3 tsp milk (as the gf flour is always thirsty I used 6 tsp milk)

 

1

Begin by creaming together the butter and sugar until its nice and light and fluffy.

Follow with the egg yolk and beat to combine.

 

 

2          Then mix in all the dry ingredients.

This is where it’s a lot quicker and easier than the traditional method of making a fly sandwich!

 

3

 

Add the milk then continue to kneed with your hands until it forms a ball. Cover and leave it to rest for 20 minutes in the fridge, unless you use gf flour then you can roll on ahead.

 

8 Roll as thin as the currents allow then cut into rectangles or use festive cutters like I have.

 

4  Bake at 160°c fan for 10 minutes, then brush with the reserved egg white and sprinkle with a little caster sugar and bake again for 5-10 minutes until golden.

 

5

 

For an extra festive touch melt white chocolate and dye with pastel spring tones. Make small baking parchment piping bags for detailed designs.

 

 

 

 

6

Enjoy your Easter treats!

Garibaldi is the name, biscuit’s the game

Bring some English tradition to your Easter celebrations by whipping up a batch of garibaldi biscuits with our simplified but just as tasty recipe.

What you need:

120g sugar

110g butter

1 egg

225g flour (in this batch I used gluten free)

1/2 tsp mixed spice (this is tricky to find in Germany so I used lebkuchengewürz which is almost the same)

80g currents

1/2 orange zest

3 tsp milk (as the gf flour is always thirsty I used 6 tsp milk)

 

1

Begin by creaming together the butter and sugar until its nice and light and fluffy.

Follow with the egg yolk and beat to combine.

 

 

2          Then mix in all the dry ingredients.

This is where it’s a lot quicker and easier than the traditional method of making a fly sandwich!

 

3

 

Add the milk then continue to kneed with your hands until it forms a ball. Cover and leave it to rest for 20 minutes in the fridge, unless you use gf flour then you can roll on ahead.

 

8 Roll as thin as the currents allow then cut into rectangles or use festive cutters like I have.

 

4  Bake at 160°c fan for 10 minutes, then brush with the reserved egg white and sprinkle with a little caster sugar and bake again for 5-10 minutes until golden.

 

5

 

For an extra festive touch melt white chocolate and dye with pastel spring tones. Make small baking parchment piping bags for detailed designs.

 

 

 

 

6

Enjoy your Easter treats!

Feast of Saint Patrick

Feast of Saint Patrick

 Celebrate St. Patrick’s day with some traditional potato based Irish fair

Before you start drinking the Guinness, how about trying out our easy recipe for delicious Farls or potato cakes;

What you need:

  • 3 medium potatoes, aprox. 300g
  • 100g plain flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1/2tsp baking powder
  • 1/2tsp salt

First, quarter and boil the potatoes in a large pan of salted water for 12–15 minutes or until just render.

Drain well and return to the pan for 1 min to allow the water to evaporate and the potatoes to dry.

Then press through a potato ricer as I have, the advantage is you don’t need to peel the potatoes before cooking or mash until really smooth.

IMG_4766

Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt.

IMG_4774

Gently kneed together to form a soft dough.

IMG_4777

Then place on a lightly floured surface and roll out into a circle about 1cm thick. Cut into quarters and dust all over with flour.

IMG_4781

To cook heat a large nonstick frying pan over medium heat (no need to add any oil). Cook the farls for 3–5mins on each side until golden brown and puffy. Serve fresh from the pan or reheat in the toaster and smother with lots of salty butter.

IMG_4783

No better way to serve then as part of an Ulster Fry, I made a vegetarian  friendly version with baked mushrooms, grilled tomato, poached egg and baked beans with a fresh mint tea – delicious at any time of the day (or night)

IMG_4851

 Celebrate St. Patrick’s day with some traditional potato based Irish fair

Before you start drinking the Guinness, how about trying out our easy recipe for delicious Farls or potato cakes;

What you need:

  • 3 medium potatoes, aprox. 300g
  • 100g plain flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1/2tsp baking powder
  • 1/2tsp salt

First, quarter and boil the potatoes in a large pan of salted water for 12–15 minutes or until just render.

Drain well and return to the pan for 1 min to allow the water to evaporate and the potatoes to dry.

Then press through a potato ricer as I have, the advantage is you don’t need to peel the potatoes before cooking or mash until really smooth.

IMG_4766

Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt.

IMG_4774

Gently kneed together to form a soft dough.

IMG_4777

Then place on a lightly floured surface and roll out into a circle about 1cm thick. Cut into quarters and dust all over with flour.

IMG_4781

To cook heat a large nonstick frying pan over medium heat (no need to add any oil). Cook the farls for 3–5mins on each side until golden brown and puffy. Serve fresh from the pan or reheat in the toaster and smother with lots of salty butter.

IMG_4783

No better way to serve then as part of an Ulster Fry, I made a vegetarian  friendly version with baked mushrooms, grilled tomato, poached egg and baked beans with a fresh mint tea – delicious at any time of the day (or night)

IMG_4851

Fruit of the month : Blood Orange

Fruit of the month : Blood Orange

Our favourite winter citrus is almost over, so make the most of the last blood oranges!

IMG_4762

You can tell a blood orange apart from the overs buy its dark rind and they tend to be quite small. When you cut it open you can see the rich ruby flesh which has a not so sweet taste but which is also a lot higher in vitamin C (perfect for fighting of the winter colds.)

Here is a simple and delicious recipe for a whole orange and almond cake which happens to be gluten and dairy free;

What you need:

2 blood oranges

6 eggs

225g sugar

1 tsp baking powder

225g ground almonds (better if you can grind them yourself)

 

First you need to boil the oranges in a medium pan covered for 1.5 hours.

Then it’s easy –  just blitz them and everything else together either with a stick blender or a food processor.

IMG_4799

Pour the batter into a lined form. Alternatively, mini forms are a great option as they cook faster for almost instant gratification.

IMG_4810

Bake at 170°c Fan for 50-60 minutes or until its golden, risen and firm to the touch.

IMG_4821

Remove from the oven and enjoy when still warm.

Happy Baking!

 

Our favourite winter citrus is almost over, so make the most of the last blood oranges!

IMG_4762

You can tell a blood orange apart from the overs buy its dark rind and they tend to be quite small. When you cut it open you can see the rich ruby flesh which has a not so sweet taste but which is also a lot higher in vitamin C (perfect for fighting of the winter colds.)

Here is a simple and delicious recipe for a whole orange and almond cake which happens to be gluten and dairy free;

What you need:

2 blood oranges

6 eggs

225g sugar

1 tsp baking powder

225g ground almonds (better if you can grind them yourself)

 

First you need to boil the oranges in a medium pan covered for 1.5 hours.

Then it’s easy –  just blitz them and everything else together either with a stick blender or a food processor.

IMG_4799

Pour the batter into a lined form. Alternatively, mini forms are a great option as they cook faster for almost instant gratification.

IMG_4810

Bake at 170°c Fan for 50-60 minutes or until its golden, risen and firm to the touch.

IMG_4821

Remove from the oven and enjoy when still warm.

Happy Baking!

Furikake: Forget the salt and pepper

Furikake: Forget the salt and pepper

All you need to know about Japanese Furikake seasoning.

This delicious seasoning is meant to be sprinkled on rice and can be found on most dinner tables in Japan. Usually you will find it as a mix of ground seaweed, sesame, fish, sugar and salt and it’s pretty hard to find a vegetarian version in the shops.

The great thing about furikake is that you can make it completely to your own taste, if you like your food spicy through in some dried chilli or if you like things salty add extra seaweed – it’s up to you!

Here is a super simple recipe (how we at Kräuterkollektiv like it) :

  • 50g sesame seeds with husk
  • 5 sheets nori
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 3 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp pepper
  • 1 tbsp chilli flakes
  • 50g whole almonds

 

IMG_4736

Start by toasting the nuts and seeds, you want them nice and golden for a rich flavour

IMG_4739

Next, get chopping! Mix everything together and with a sharp knife bring it all together.

Watch out for the nori, it can be tricky to cut so try using scissors or just tearing it up into little pieces first.

IMG_4746

The finished product (after lots and lots of chopping.)

Season to taste and keep it in an airtight jar for however long it takes you to eat it!

Don’t just keep it for rice either, use it on top of pasta dishes, soups, or just when something you’ve made is missing something…

I couldn’t resist making a super quick and simple miso soup – yummy ^^

IMG_4754

 

All you need to know about Japanese Furikake seasoning.

This delicious seasoning is meant to be sprinkled on rice and can be found on most dinner tables in Japan. Usually you will find it as a mix of ground seaweed, sesame, fish, sugar and salt and it’s pretty hard to find a vegetarian version in the shops.

The great thing about furikake is that you can make it completely to your own taste, if you like your food spicy through in some dried chilli or if you like things salty add extra seaweed – it’s up to you!

Here is a super simple recipe (how we at Kräuterkollektiv like it) :

  • 50g sesame seeds with husk
  • 5 sheets nori
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 3 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp pepper
  • 1 tbsp chilli flakes
  • 50g whole almonds

 

IMG_4736

Start by toasting the nuts and seeds, you want them nice and golden for a rich flavour

IMG_4739

Next, get chopping! Mix everything together and with a sharp knife bring it all together.

Watch out for the nori, it can be tricky to cut so try using scissors or just tearing it up into little pieces first.

IMG_4746

The finished product (after lots and lots of chopping.)

Season to taste and keep it in an airtight jar for however long it takes you to eat it!

Don’t just keep it for rice either, use it on top of pasta dishes, soups, or just when something you’ve made is missing something…

I couldn’t resist making a super quick and simple miso soup – yummy ^^

IMG_4754

Vegetable of the month: Black Salsify

Vegetable of the month: Black Salsify

What to do with those dirty, black, sticks?

Black Salsify (Schwarzwurzel auf Deutsch) is a root vegetable with thick black skin and milky white flesh.

Untitled-1

Some say it tastes like oysters (we couldn’t tell you if that is true) I would liken it to a sweet buttery potato. It can be cooked in a variety of ways boiled, mashed roasted and anything in between. Today I will share an easy but impressive way to cook it perfect for a special occasion.

Salsify in crispy filo with lemon and chilli

  • 500g black salsify
  • 6-8 sheets filo pastry
  • 1 lemon, unwaxed
  • chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • 50g butter
  • 2tbsp olive oil
  • seasoning to taste

Begin by peeling, trimming and washing the roots, you will find its quite a messy job but if done in a sink full of water its a lot less sticky (no pun intended) and easier to clean up. Cut any fat roots in half.

Heat a pan with 2tbsp oil and a small nob of butter, add the sticks and fry for 2 mins over a medium heat.

Next add the zest and juice of 1 lemon, 100ml water, cover and gently cook for a further 6-8 minutes until almost tender. season well and set aside.

Unroll the pastry and scatter a large pinch of the cheese then place one of the roots at one end and carfully roll up until 1/4 of the pastry is left.

Brush (or use your finger tips) butter over the edges and fold over the ends and finish rolling up.

 

 

IMG_4722

Repeat until all the roots are used up. If you have some small ones just pair them up together.

Lay them out on a baking tray and sprinkle with more of the cheese, chilli flakes, sesame seeds and salt.

Cook at 180°c for 15 minutes or until golden.

IMG_4725

And Enjoy!

IMG_4733

What to do with those dirty, black, sticks?

Black Salsify (Schwarzwurzel auf Deutsch) is a root vegetable with thick black skin and milky white flesh.

Untitled-1

Some say it tastes like oysters (we couldn’t tell you if that is true) I would liken it to a sweet buttery potato. It can be cooked in a variety of ways boiled, mashed roasted and anything in between. Today I will share an easy but impressive way to cook it perfect for a special occasion.

Salsify in crispy filo with lemon and chilli

  • 500g black salsify
  • 6-8 sheets filo pastry
  • 1 lemon, unwaxed
  • chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • 50g butter
  • 2tbsp olive oil
  • seasoning to taste

Begin by peeling, trimming and washing the roots, you will find its quite a messy job but if done in a sink full of water its a lot less sticky (no pun intended) and easier to clean up. Cut any fat roots in half.

Heat a pan with 2tbsp oil and a small nob of butter, add the sticks and fry for 2 mins over a medium heat.

Next add the zest and juice of 1 lemon, 100ml water, cover and gently cook for a further 6-8 minutes until almost tender. season well and set aside.

Unroll the pastry and scatter a large pinch of the cheese then place one of the roots at one end and carfully roll up until 1/4 of the pastry is left.

Brush (or use your finger tips) butter over the edges and fold over the ends and finish rolling up.

 

 

IMG_4722

Repeat until all the roots are used up. If you have some small ones just pair them up together.

Lay them out on a baking tray and sprinkle with more of the cheese, chilli flakes, sesame seeds and salt.

Cook at 180°c for 15 minutes or until golden.

IMG_4725

And Enjoy!

IMG_4733

Fast Nacht, Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras!

Fast Nacht, Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras!

This very old tradition is celebrated in many different countries all around the world. It represents the last day of eating fatty food before the fasting of the penitential season of Lent. Although it is linked to Lent and the catholic tradition, it was originally a pagan celebration, Lupercalia, that existed before the Romans time. At that time the year was begining in  March, and February was the time to request fertility and luck for the new year, and before everything, to party! The slaves will be served by their masters, the kids will have the rights of grown ups, the men will dress up like women etc…

Today, there is still big parades in some regions, like on the picture, that was taken in the Dunkerke Carnaval in the North of France.

It became “Carnevale” when it became a catholic celebration – in italian, “carne” = “meat”; “levare” = “remove”.

But let´s come to what interest us: food! Using eggs, milk and butter, which were forbidden during the Lent, the crepes use to represent a festive and fatty meal to go with the celebration of Carnaval.

The tradition says that when you make the crepe jump in  the air to turn it around, you need to have a coin in your other hand to garantee prosperity!

Here is a traditional recipe for crêpes that comes from Bretagne:

ingredcrepes

* 450g flour

* 50g buckwheat flour

* 1 pinch salt

* 200g sugar

* 3 eggs

* 50g melted butter

* 1, 25 L milk

* I like to add a tablespoon of rhum

Mix all the ingredients together.

Leave the batter to rest for a few hours, even better: all night.

Don´t forget to drink cider with it!

And as it´s enough for today with traditions, let´s go for our 2015 version of the “Crêpes Suzette”! It gives a modern twist to this pretty old fashion recipe!

IMG_20150217_123152(1)

For 6 crêpes:

* 80 g sugar

* 80g butter

* the juice of 2 limes

* the zest of 1 lime

* 20 cL gin

* If you´re really adventurous, you can also add some finally gratted ginger…

Caramelise the sugar in a pan, then deglaze with the gin and the lime juice.

Add the zest and the butter and let the mix thicken for a few minutes.

Make a crepes, then spread some lime butter inside, fold it in 4 and drizzle with some more butter.

Happy Carnaval!

This very old tradition is celebrated in many different countries all around the world. It represents the last day of eating fatty food before the fasting of the penitential season of Lent. Although it is linked to Lent and the catholic tradition, it was originally a pagan celebration, Lupercalia, that existed before the Romans time. At that time the year was begining in  March, and February was the time to request fertility and luck for the new year, and before everything, to party! The slaves will be served by their masters, the kids will have the rights of grown ups, the men will dress up like women etc…

Today, there is still big parades in some regions, like on the picture, that was taken in the Dunkerke Carnaval in the North of France.

It became “Carnevale” when it became a catholic celebration – in italian, “carne” = “meat”; “levare” = “remove”.

But let´s come to what interest us: food! Using eggs, milk and butter, which were forbidden during the Lent, the crepes use to represent a festive and fatty meal to go with the celebration of Carnaval.

The tradition says that when you make the crepe jump in  the air to turn it around, you need to have a coin in your other hand to garantee prosperity!

Here is a traditional recipe for crêpes that comes from Bretagne:

ingredcrepes

* 450g flour

* 50g buckwheat flour

* 1 pinch salt

* 200g sugar

* 3 eggs

* 50g melted butter

* 1, 25 L milk

* I like to add a tablespoon of rhum

Mix all the ingredients together.

Leave the batter to rest for a few hours, even better: all night.

Don´t forget to drink cider with it!

And as it´s enough for today with traditions, let´s go for our 2015 version of the “Crêpes Suzette”! It gives a modern twist to this pretty old fashion recipe!

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For 6 crêpes:

* 80 g sugar

* 80g butter

* the juice of 2 limes

* the zest of 1 lime

* 20 cL gin

* If you´re really adventurous, you can also add some finally gratted ginger…

Caramelise the sugar in a pan, then deglaze with the gin and the lime juice.

Add the zest and the butter and let the mix thicken for a few minutes.

Make a crepes, then spread some lime butter inside, fold it in 4 and drizzle with some more butter.

Happy Carnaval!

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